Can the Prison Industry Accurately Predict Future Inmate Population

Major attention is currently being given to a system that the United States prison industry has been using to determine the future inmate population. The system is controversial because it is used to label individuals as future criminals based on indicators such as personal background and family status. Although these indicators have been statistically proven to correlate to crime rates, critics argue that it is unfair and unjust to use them to predict a potential inmate count for American correctional facilities. The system has been implemented into the structure of the United States prison system for a number of years.

The system for predicting the inmate population of correctional facilities was initially introduced into the program as a means to predict the average yearly incarceration rate of the facilities. The system has now been effectively turned into an income producing model for most prisons and is used as a means to help find and convict criminals. The problem with this model, according to prominent researchers, is that it unfairly targets specific groups of people as more likely to commit crimes than other people, and thus makes it more likely that these people groups are stopped by police and arrested for crimes.

Because of this line of reasoning, a serious question regarding this inmate prediction system. Critics have inquired as to how much the correlation between the background of individuals and their likelihood to engage in criminal activity is affected by the fact that investigators often use this system to make arrests and pinpoint suspects. If the system does affect the correlation, critics are right to demand that the system be corrected in order to reflect more current behavior patterns and information about the circumstances that lead to an individual’s participation in criminal activities. More information about this subject can be found here.